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Chirk Marina

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Chirk’s lovely marina is situated between the two stunning Aqueducts, Chirk Aqueduct and Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and near the National Trust site of Chirk Castle.

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chirk bank bridge

Chirk Bank

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Chirk Bank is a small village in Shropshire, England and is the first village on the World Heritage site after you cross the border from Wales into England. Chirk bank is where there once was a wharf for the interchange of goods between the road and the canal. Canal view cottages were originally built by the for maintenance staff.

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Trevor

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Trevor is a village situated in the scenic Vale of Llangollen, on the A539 between Llangollen and Wrexham . Its name is an anglicised version of the Welsh place-name Trefor, meaning "large village". This was one of the old townships of the parish of Llangollen, giving its name to both a powerful landowning family whose ancestral home was in the township, and to the later industrial settlement represented by the modern village. In common with neighbouring Froncysyllte, Trevor is largely made up of nineteenth- and twentieth-century cottages for workers in the area's traditional industries of limestone quarrying and brick-making. Although these industries have now disappeared the area has a rich industrial archeology.

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Froncysyllte

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Froncysyllte colloquially known as Fron, stands on the banks of the River Dee and the Llangollen Canal. It is situated on the main A5 road which runs from London to Holyhead. The name is derived from the Welsh fron, meaning a hillside or slope, along with the name Cysyllte, one of the old townships of the parish of Llangollen. Froncysyllte is situated in the farming landscape of the Vale of Llangollen, but first developed as a settlement of cottages for quarry, limekiln, brick and tile workers during the nineteenth century. The village was built on a high outcrop of limestone below several quarries. Though the area's traditional industries have now gone, it still has a rich industrial archaeology.

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llantysilio church

Llantysilio

HorseShoe Falls

Horseshoe Falls

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The Horseshoe Falls is where it all begins. Telford designed this weir to draw water from the River Dee into the canal and, like so many of his creations, it only seems to enhance the beauty of the landscape around it.

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Gorsaf Berwyn Station

Berwyn Station

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Take a short journey on Llangollen Railway to Berwyn Station, cross the Chainbridge over the River Dee, an excellent starting point to explore the World Heritage Site and Dee Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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Chain Bridge

Chain Bridge

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Accessible by foot and restored and reopened to the public during 2015, having originally been built in 1817 to transport coal to the A5. The bridge provide a strong link between the Llangollen railway and the canal. A perfect way to cross the River Dee.

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Valle Crucis Abbey

Valle Crucis Abbey

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Sitting peacefully in the fields beneath Llangollen's steep green mountains, lies the ruins of Valle Crucis Abbey. The 13th Century ruins, once inhabited by Cistercian Monks, still retain many original features including the glorious west front complete with an elaborate, richly carved doorway, beautiful rose window and 14th century inscription which reads 'Abbot Adams carried out this work; may he rest in peace. Amen'.

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Llan Pavilion

Llangollen Pavilion

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If you can tear your eyes away from the fish flitting through the clear waters of Llangollen Canal, you'll see the International Pavilion emerge from the meadowland to your right. Built in 1992 and capable of seating 4,500 people, this is the home of the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod. Not content with welcoming 120,000 festival goers and musicians and performers every July, the pavilion hosts a year -round programme of concerts and events including the Food Festival in October.

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Train at Llangollen Railway

Llangollen Railway

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This beautiful, picturesque heritage railway is located beside the historic Dee Bridge (built in 1345) and journeys 10 miles through the picturesque Dee Valley from Llangollen to the town of Corwen.

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Horsedrawn Canal Transport Llangollen

Llangollen Wharf

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Llangollen Wharf is one of the longest established visitor attractions in the North Wales market town of Llangollen. From the Wharf you can embark on either a horse drawn boat trip along the feeder for the main canal, or a motorised aqueduct boat trip which takes you across the famous Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. Both these boat trips take in the magical sights and sounds of the beautiful Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal World Heritage Site.

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Plas Newydd

Plas Newydd House and Gardens

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Plas Newydd House and Gardens was the home of Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby - the "Ladies of Llangollen". They received a stream of visitors to the cottage which, over the years, they transformed into a Gothic fantasy of stained glass and elaborately carved oak.

Come and explore the house and gardens, and take tea, as Wordsworth, Sir Walter Scott and the Duke of Wellington have all done before you.

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Llangollen TIC exterior

Llangollen Tourist Information

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In this digital age of websites, smart phones and call centres, it is possible to pop into our Tourist Information Centre and meet real local people who will be pleased to help with your enquiry.

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Llangollen bridge

Llangollen

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Llangollen has long been one of Wales's most popular inland resorts. Its setting, guarded by mountains and the ruins of a 13th century Castell Dinas Bran, is uniquely picturesque and tourists have been drawn here since Georgian times.

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Dinas Bran

Dinas Brân Castle

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Castell Dinas Bran is set high above Llangollen and can be seen from miles around.
Little remains of this once magnificent fortress, but the effort needed for the steep climb up the pathway is more than rewarded by the spectacular views.

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Trevor Basin

Trevor Basin

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Trevor Basin is located next to the aqueduct and is home to a number of local businesses. The Visitor Centre houses a collection of historical artifacts dating back to its construction. Visitors can enjoy a film, where people talk about their memories and feelings towards Pontcysyllte and watch an animation that explains how it was built.
There is also children’s activity area including a wooden ‘build the aqueduct’ puzzle and a gift shop. Friendly staff and volunteers are always on hand to help.

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Old Railway line finger post

Old Railway Line Walk

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Enjoy this gentle stroll in the beautiful Dee Valley and Pontcysyllte World Heritage Site, along the old railway line and the canal near the amazing Pontcysyllte aqueduct

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Pontcysyllte aqueduct at dawn

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

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Dare you cross it? And can you do it without looking down?

Designed and built by Thomas Telford and Williams Jessop, Pontcysyllte means 'the bridge that connects' and is 'the jewel in the crown' of our World Heritage Site, a magnet for those who want to experience one of the most remarkable achievements of the industrial revolution.
You can walk across Pontcysyllte, or save your legs and take a leisurely boat ride or why not hire a boat for the day or longer from one businesses based at Trevor Basin. But there's one thing you have to take with you. A camera. The views are something else.

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Chirk Main street view

Chirk

Chirk from Castle Road

St Mary’s Church

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St Mary's church is an impressive Grade 1 listed building and is mostly 15th century with some remnants of an earlier building. It has a remarkable collection of 18th century memorials of the Myddelton family, former owners of Chirk Castle, and the Trevor family, the former chief local landowners. The church also contains some restored and painted roof carvings of buildings and strange looking animals and several examples of heraldic arms.

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Ty Mawr Country Park

Tŷ Mawr Country Park

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Ty Mawr is a peaceful one mile walk along the River Dee from Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. Full of fun for all the family with a children's park, animals, picnic areas, a visitor centre and walks- why not pay a visit!

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Bridge number 19

Gledrid Bridge

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Gledrid Bridge is in England and is the entrance to the World Heritage Site. It is one of the few standard bridges of the canal built of brick rather than stone as the canal had not reached the supplies of good building stone further along the canal.

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Cefn Mawr. Crane st

Cefn Mawr Historic Industrial Village

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Cefn Mawr was a new town created by the opportunities the canal brought, when a settlement grew up around stone quarries, ironworks, clay works and coal mines. The ribs for the arches of Pontcysyllte Aqueduct were cast at William Hazeldine's Plas Kynastons iron foundry in Cefn Mawr.

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chirk castle outside

Chirk Castle

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This magnificent National Trust Property comprises of a Medieval castle with over 700 years of history, award winning gardens, and castle gates that are a sight to behold- it's well worth a visit.

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Chirk viaduct with train.

Chirk Viaduct

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Chirk Viaduct, was built by Scottish engineer, Henry Robertson. It opened in 1848 and still carries trains on a daily basis. The Viaduct isn't accessible by foot, but can be seen close-up from Chirk Aqueduct- which sits right alongside it.

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Chirk Aqueduct with barge on it

Chirk Aqueduct and Tunnel

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Cross the English/Welsh border via Chirk Aqueduct, which carries the Llangollen branch of the Shropshire Union canal 70 feet above the beautiful Ceiriog Valley. The aqueduct which has 10 circular masonry arches, was built between 1796 and 1801 by William Jessop and Thomas Telford. Cross by foot or via the canal it's a must see whilst in the area.
Chirk tunnel (known locally as 'The Darkie') was one of the first in the UK to have a towpath and was built between 1795 -1802.

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